Class Warfare Blog

August 2, 2020

There’s Wrong and Then There is Wronger (and Wrongest?)

Filed under: Culture,Technology — Steve Ruis @ 7:52 am
Tags: , ,

I was watching the Cubs baseball game last night and the announcers announced the temperature at the start of the game was “room temperature,” right at 72° F. An inning or so later one of them wondered why 72° F ended up standard room temperature (here in the U.S.). So, during a commercial message one of them went online and found an answer. He stated that 72° F was standard room temperature because that temperature was derived “from internal body temperatures being 98.6 degrees ±, thus making the temperature of skin to be around 72-76 degrees Fahrenheit.” So, room temperature was skin temperature apparently. The two announcers lauded having so much wonderful information at their fingertips and how it was so much better to know than to sit in ignorance.

I am sitting there thinking WTF?!

There is a clinical term for when one’s skin temperature is equal to room temperature, what was it now . . . oh, yeah, DEAD! My memory came up with a number of 92° F for skin temperature and a very quick search came up with a better number, a range actually: roughly 92° F to 98+° F. (Your fingers are exposed to the environment more so than, say, your armpit and so are colder. Your armpit is close to the conditions existing inside your body so the skin temp there is close to your internal body temp.)

So, the answer the baseball announcers come up with, how could it have been so wrong? Well, it was a quote from the Quora web site. Quora is a question and answer website on which people ask questions (sincere and not so) and other people supply answers (also sincere and not so). Whether the answers are right or wrong or in between isn’t curated.

So, the answerer on Quora either was blowing smoke or was told something that sounded right by someone else, or . . . whatever, and then the announcers shared this incorrect information with a couple of million people.

This is certainly indicative of our current culture.

We are at least past the “it has to be right otherwise they wouldn’t let them put it on the Internet” stage but not very far past. As was the case before the Internet, you have to know a lot to be able to find correct information. My favorite example from those pre-Internet days was looking up how to spell a word in a dictionary. So, to begin what do you need to find the listing for that word in the dictionary? The spelling, of course!

So, if you are looking for something on the Internet, you need to look at more than just the top listing provided by a search engine. If you have no way to verify whether what you looked up is reliable, you need to refer to several such items to see if you can find a consensus. You need to consider the sources of those bits of information. (This was one of the errors the broadcasters made; one of them needed to know that Quora answers are not necessarily dependable.)

And then when you mention what you have found, you begin the statement with “According to <reference> . . . blah, blah, blah.” This does not include using “According to the Internet . . .” as the Internet has no opinions or knowledge of its own, only what has been posted there by others. (I know the Internet. The Internet and I are friends and, trust me, you’re no Internet.—If you recognize the quote from which this was crafted, you are older than you look.)

And this is how any number of conspiracy theories and bogus movements get started. I honestly do not believe that there is a Flat Earth Society, or whatever they are called now, that is full of committed believers. I am more likely to believe it is full of iconoclasts and people who like attention over approval (almost always males, btw). But some of these other people are not healthy psychologically and it is not good for them or society in general to be so provoked.

If you are wondering why “72° F (ca. 22° C) ended up standard room temperature here in the U.S.” you can look it up and the real answer makes a great deal of sense.

September 29, 2016

Ted Cruz, the Internet, and Republican Consistency

Filed under: Politics — Steve Ruis @ 9:38 am
Tags: , , , ,

The Obama administration plans to transfer its oversight of Internet domain name registrations to the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, a multinational private organization based in Los Angeles. This is unconscionable to, of all people, Ted Cruz, bizarro senator from Texas.

Wait, a Republican is insisting that something is better done by government than by a private organization? WTF?

Apparently Republicans are out to prove the Ralph Waldo Emerson quote: “A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds.”

Blog at WordPress.com.