Class Warfare Blog

March 28, 2018

What Would Christies Do?

Filed under: History,Religion — Steve Ruis @ 9:08 am
Tags: , , ,

I read another Quora question based upon the questioner’s belief that Noah’s Ark, or evidence for Noah’s Ark, has been found. I believe I have posted before that this event is more than highly unlikely, first because the tale is almost certainly fictional wisdom literature (You better be good or God will kill you and your little dog, too!), but specifically because after the entire planet has been underwater for a year or more, there would be no suitable building materials available: no straw, no wood (not waterlogged), etc. although there would be some stone. So, what would Noah’s family’s shelters, livestock pens, and altars be made of? Piles of small stones? Well, there is this giant pile of lumber sitting there that no longer had a use, so I expect that, if this really happened, the ark would have been dismantled to provide a wealth of building materials. And as time wore on, I am sure having some part of the ark used to make one’s dwelling would be looked upon as being lucky or holy or some other nonsense and soon an expanding population woudl guarantee that the ark would be gone, dispersed, burned, carved up.

Now I have to think that this search is wrong-headed. First, finding that evidence would mean more to Jews than Christians and Jews are quite few in number. So, if you were going to go looking for tangible artifacts to support Christianity, what should you look for? Think about it; I will wait.

<insert Jeopardy theme music here>

If you came up with “remnants of the cross” or “the Holy Grail” or some such, you are a victim of indoctrination. I ask you: what was Jesus’s occupation? All say he was a “carpenter,” with that term not quite meaning what we think of today as a carpenter, but more of a jack-of-all-trades handyman, who worked a lot with wood. Jesus would have been taught his craft when he turned a certain age, 11, 12, 13 whatever, so he would have a body of work created over a 20-year span before he went off on his wild hare chase. So, over that time, he must have made a great many pieces of, say, furniture: stools on which to milk goats, benches, chairs, tables, etc. And being a good craftsman, perfect actually, would have involved a little self promotion so, on the bottoms of these pieces don’t you think he would have written or carved “Made by Jesus of Nazareth, 7 Goatherd Street, Nazareth” or some such? If a contemporary were to pick up one of these pieces second hand and wonder where he could get more, there needs to be a connection to its maker, no? And these pieces, I mean, made by a god! They would be beautiful to the eye, sturdy, long lasting, etc. Find one of these pieces and cha-ching! Can you imagine what such a piece would bring at auction?

What would Christies do?

(Hint: they would go out of their fricking minds!)

2 Comments »

  1. One could also use arguments in defense of the faith to defend the provenance of such artifacts. Don’t believe it’s a chair handcrafted by the late JC? You can’t prove it’s not made by a divine creator, so it must belong to him. Other coffee tables pale in comparison to this one; it has to be of divine origin. Objective moral values exist, therefore this saw horse was used by Jesus. Bidding starts at a LOT of money.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Sirius Bizinus — March 28, 2018 @ 9:37 am | Reply

    • Religious artifacts have been a going business for quite some time (started by a Roman emperess, don’t you know). Since this trade has been so lucrative, I am a bit surprises artifacts as I suggest haven’t hit the market, especially because such artifacts enjoy a well-hidden market (so maybe there are so). Israel and other counties have strict laws about possession and sale of religious artifacts so rather than a public auction, a “private sale” may be more in order.

      On Wed, Mar 28, 2018 at 9:37 AM, Class Warfare Blog wrote:

      >

      Liked by 2 people

      Comment by Steve Ruis — March 28, 2018 @ 9:49 am | Reply


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