Class Warfare Blog

January 12, 2017

Having a Reason to Live

Filed under: Religion — Steve Ruis @ 11:57 am
Tags: , ,

It is illuminating to hear from theists what they think “the meaning of life” is. A letter to an editor of a Canadian newspaper from a theist subscriber gives a typical glimpse:
The secular view, which leaves God out of the process, reveals that I am the descendant of a tiny cell of primordial protoplasm—the arbitrary product of time, chance and natural forces. … I exist on a tiny planet in a minor solar system in an empty corner of a meaningless universe. I have no intrinsic value beyond my body, and at death I will cease to exist.

“Therefore, I conclude that I came from essentially nothing and I am going nowhere. But, if I am only a dash between the womb and the tomb and I don’t know why, then I must ask if there is any real purpose for my life either now or in the future?

“In contrast, the Christian story offers me tremendous hope. I discover that I am not the result of some cosmic accident but the special creation of a good and all powerful God — His crown of creation. I am created in His image, with capacities to think, love, worship and make moral choices that set me above all other life forms.

“My creator loves me and gave His son to pay the supreme sacrifice for my salvation. I am completely unworthy and undeserving of such love. My salvation is entirely by grace through faith and not of myself.

“Best of all, the fact that Christ died for each one of us and wants to live within us by His spirit in a meaningful relationship makes us incredibly valuable. And when we are willing to accept His gift of salvation, through repentance and faith, we can become children of God and spend eternity with Him.

Okay, so setting aside whether or not this theist’s soul preexisted his life here on Earth, presumably his existence will be spent 99.9% of his time in Heaven where he will … “spend eternity with Him.” Uh, doing what? In order for this person’s life to have meaning it has to be in some sort of context, no? Certainly it cannot have anything to do with “helping other people” as all of the other people in Heaven don’t need help and the people in Hell, well they need help, but … what that’s not allowed?

Apparently the definition of “meaning” being employed here is “something meant or intended.” What is meant here as a “meaning for this person’s life” is that he was created for a purpose and that purpose is to spend the vast bulk of his existence in the presence of his god. Hmm, if I were there, in his god’s presence, I would expect some sort of euphoria, an understanding of all things and why they are the way they are, but then what? Do I just exist with a god buzz for millennia? What good am I at that point? I am not even an example to others because they have no idea as to which “place” I ended up in.

Am I a marker in God’s game? Do He and Satan have a big scoreboard up showing how many souls they have collected? What was God’s purpose in going through this whole thing, and putting us through this whole thing; was it just to have one more “presence” in Heaven? What is life on Earth if it constitutes just a tiny, tiny slice of time in a soul’s existence but determines where the 99.9+% of eternity each of us will spend, either in Heaven or a Lake of Fire? Since wisdom seems to come with age, why are our lives cut off after a measly 100 years or so? What not give us two or three hundred years to figure it out?

“One does not have to be a member of a church to donate time at a food bank
(or even a church, which I have done) or to do other charitable works.”

I am impressed with this theist and the many others who have backed a scheme they know so little about. They make Pascal seem a piker with his puny wager. They have gone all in.

What I find appalling however is the lack of appreciation for the opportunities of life, life on Earth. Unlike rocks, we can do things. Where do the attitudes that generate sentences like “I have no intrinsic value beyond my body, and at death I will cease to exist.” and “I must ask if there is any real purpose for my life.” and “My salvation is entirely by grace through faith and not of myself.” come from? Possibly from theists painting the most dismal picture of secular lives as they possibly can. On the other hand, as a real secularist, unlike the one’s existing in this writer’s imagination, I am grateful for my life. I don’t particularly attribute my life to my parents because I don’t really think they knew what they were getting into. They were responding to the rhythms of life: to live, to cherish, to propagate, etc. I am grateful to my parents for all of the loving care they lavished on me growing up and later in life. I am grateful that I was provided a good education (at least the opportunity for one) and a great deal more. I am grateful to have opportunities to help people, which I do in small ways all over the world. I feel that if my life is to have meaning, then I have to get cracking and make that meaning. If one’s life has a great deal of meaning, then a goodly number of people will remember you positively, so there is a measure of whether or not a good life was lived. People will also tell you whether or not you have helped them, which is very nice direct feedback. Facebook “Likes” and other phony connections do not count and, of course, being remembered for bad actions is not a good thing at all.

One does not have to be a member of a church to donate time at a food bank (or even a church, which I have done) or to do other charitable works. Secularists are not trying to get good grades to get into Heaven, and neither are theists, certainly not the ones who say things like “My salvation is entirely by grace through faith and not of myself.” If salvation comes only by the grace of God, where does the urge to help others come from? Why are theists not participating in an “I am in this for myself” contest with Heaven as the prize? (Maybe they are.) If God really wanted us to be good to one another, why did He not make it clear that we are to do “good works” as a qualification for graduation? Why is the Golden Rule “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you”? Why is it not simply “Do good for others, no matter what they do to you”? Now that would be clear, instead of telling us to “turn the other cheek” inviting further abuse, why not do some good for the person who struck you?

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6 Comments »

  1. Bravo!

    They would rather believe the lie than face reality. Sniveling cowards if you ask me.

    “On the other hand, as a real secularist, unlike the one’s existing in this writer’s imagination, I am grateful for my life.” THIS!

    Every single theist who wants to paint that dismal picture of an atheist needs that sentence tattooed to their damn forehead. They know nothing of our lives and the value we place in life, in family, in things beautiful, in things of interest. They must believe we are lost souls with nothing or they got nothing to keep, religiously speaking.

    Too bad what they are hanging on to is a big fat lie.

    Comment by shelldigger — January 12, 2017 @ 1:02 pm | Reply

    • I do not want to denigrate them (forgive them, they know not what they do). They were more than likely indoctrinated as children and you can see from their dismal view of what our lives are like as Godless atheists, etc., etc. the indoctrination is continuing. Imagine a religious magazine highlighting a secular life lived well every month. Wouldn’t so much good for contributions or church attendance, I think. Demonizing ones “enemies” comes easy to humans, so I want to keep the thought in mind that each and every one of them is an atheist in waiting. Just a matter of time.

      Comment by Steve Ruis — January 12, 2017 @ 1:25 pm | Reply

      • Demonizing ones “enemies” comes easy to humans Christians …

        Comment by Nan — January 12, 2017 @ 3:04 pm | Reply

        • I think you just proved my point. ;o)

          On Thu, Jan 12, 2017 at 3:04 PM, Class Warfare Blog wrote:

          >

          Comment by Steve Ruis — January 13, 2017 @ 9:33 am | Reply

      • I agree mostly 🙂 I still don’t mind calling a spade a spade. And sometimes, not always, not even often, but sometimes when you push that envelope just a little, it has the ability to cause some introspection with certain people. I know most will clam up and do the “la la la” thing. But I don’t mind banging the pot with the spoon. 🙂

        Comment by shelldigger — January 12, 2017 @ 6:23 pm | Reply

        • I am a pitcher of scorn ready to pour, so I do not disagree. I want to be better at separating the people from their behaviors is my point.

          On Thu, Jan 12, 2017 at 6:23 PM, Class Warfare Blog wrote:

          >

          Comment by Steve Ruis — January 13, 2017 @ 9:34 am | Reply


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