Class Warfare Blog

May 11, 2016

Why are the Facts About American Education So Hard to State?

In yet another stellar post on “the Daily Howler,” we get the following comment regarding a new Stanford University study on the status of national education:

“We know of no reason to think that the new Stanford study has been bungled in any way. Indeed, lead researcher Sean Reardon has produced valuable work in the past. In April 2013, he even broke an unwritten rule. In a lengthy New York Times essay, he reported that American kids have shown large score gains on academic tests over the past forty years. ‘The average 9-year-old today has math skills equal to those her parents had at age 11, a two-year improvement in a single generation … there is no evidence that average test scores have declined over the last three decades for any age or economic group…. The achievement gaps between blacks and whites, and Hispanic and non-Hispanic whites, have been narrowing slowly over the last two decades.’”

The statement “The average 9-year-old today has math skills equal to those her parents had at age 11, a two-year improvement in a single generation.” is astonishing. The entire public education debate has been based on a drumbeat that our school system is failing our kids. How is this fact compatible with the overwhelming evidence that our schools are failing us?

“The “failure” claim of the public education reformists is a flat out lie.”

The simple answer is that it is not. The “failure” claim of the public education reformists is a flat out lie. It was a “big lie” needed to generate the outrage needed to effect change the plutocrats wanted (profits, weaker teachers unions, etc.). Unfortunately the change has only been to siphon off public education funds into the coffers of education businesses.

I would still like to know how it is that extracting profits from a system that produced none before can possibly improve that system?

And, riddle me this. The biggest question ducked by the reformists is: “if students are unable to meet the standards as they were, how is it that adopting higher standards would help them?” Is this not a little like trying to help a struggling high jumper by raising the bar? Is not the whole idea, that we need higher standards to help struggling poor and minority kids succeed, deeply flawed? How is it that all of that progress was made without the “higher standards effect,” that still hasn’t shown up.

Wake up people, the Robber Barons are in our schools and are “monetizing” our children. They are replacing a school system that was working with one that is worse … but more profitable for them. (Does this sound familiar?)

Advertisements

Leave a Comment »

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: